Posts Tagged ‘Lagos’

Phantom House Books Nigeria commemorates the International Day of the Word by public reading, starting with a poem by the hour, every hour, and distributing free Tee Shirts in Lagos! Get yours here at http://www.phantomhouseafrica.co.nr until 00:00 GMT today!

For males: tee-shirts male

 

<Selected Poems>

 

8: 00 GMT

I live between the fire and the plague…
with my language…
with this mute universe.
Adonis (1929- )
Syrian poet.
“The Fall”

9:00 GMT
Speech is civilization itself. The word, even the most contradictory, preserves contact…
it is silence which isolates.
Thomas Mann (1875 – 1955)
German writer.
The Magic Mountain

10:00 GMT
If confusion is the sign of the times, I see at the root of this confusion a rupture between things and words, between things and the ideas and signs that are their representation.
Antonin Artaud (1896 – 1948)
French actor, playwright, and writer.
The Theatre and its Double

11:00 GMT
And the stone word fell
Upon my still living breast.
Never mind, I was prepared for this.
Somehow, I shall stand the test.

Anna Akhmatova (1889 – 1966)
Russian poet.
“The Sentence” (Peter Norman (tr.))

12:00 GMT
As pine trees
hold the wind’s imprint
after the wind has gone, is no longer there,
so words
retain a man’s imprint
after the man has gone, is no longer there.

George Seferis (1900 – 1971)
Greek poet and diplomat.
“On Stage” (Edmund Keeley and Philip Sherrard (tr.))

13:00 GMT
The world’s history is a divine poem, of which the history of every nation is a canto, and every man a word.
James A Garfield (1831 – 1881) U.S. president.

14:00 GMT
It becomes still more difficult to find
Words at once true and kind,
Or not untrue and not unkind.

Philip Larkin (1922 – 1985)
British poet.
“Talking in Bed”

15:00 GMT
What is honour? A word. What is in that word? Honour. What is that honour? Air.
William Shakespeare (1564 – 1616)
English poet and playwright.
Henry IV, Part 1, Act 5, Scene 1

16:00 GMT
In countries where the imagination of the people, and the language they use, is rich and living, it is possible for a writer to be rich and copious in his words, and at the same time to give the reality, which is the root of all poetry, in a comprehensive and natural form.

J. M. Synge (1871 – 1909)
Irish playwright.
The Playboy of the Western World

17:00 GMT
Until we learn the use of living words we shall continue to be waxworks inhabited by gramophones.

Walter de la Mare (1873 – 1956)
British poet and novelist.
The Observer (London), “Sayings of the Week”

18:00 GMT
‘When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.’
Lewis Carroll (1832 – 1898)
British writer and mathematician.
Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There

for females: tee-shirts female

 

Producer Seyi Babatope of Phebean Films with Kene Mparu of FilmOne Distribution Inc today premiered ‘When Love Happens’ at Genesis Cinemas, The Palms, Lekki and we must confess the movie beat all expectations. I, representing Phantom House Books, was privileged to be onset when the movie was being shot and I remember Seyi having Sound and Logistic problems. Truth is, I don’t know how he did it in post-production, but he sure did pull it off.

I must mention, that I myself, am not a fan of postmodern Nigerian movies, but this is a total bencher! I almost coughed out my lungs from popcorn and laughed my heart out at this hearty romantic comedy all through the premiere. The photography was top-notch done by Pindem Lot and the casting was thorough. I said thorough. I wasn’t too surprised by seeing Uche (Weruche Opia) and OC (Ukeje) command the screens as their commitment on set was absolute; what is required from every actor,  including the recognition of lines, but seeing the likes of Desmond Elliot, Wale Ojo, Bernard, as well as “Shaffy” (Bello) and “keppy” (Ekpeyong), my two glamorized couple (also my favorite couple) putting so much into this near 2-hour full feature had me thunderstruck. Might be due to the reasons that they all had fun on set. I know Seyi made sure everyone felt like family. Aside his occasional disgruntlement at the crew. Heh. In fact when it came to the Questions and Answers session at the premiere, it was nothing but laudable praise from everyone including trenchant critics for Babatope and his delicate cast. He’d once mentioned to me these people were the best at what they do, but I had to see Uche and Ukeje live during filming to believe that—I too being a not-too-sarcastic critic myself.

Now back to us. What’s intriguing to us in all this is that though this work is an original creation by the man himself, this producer is challenge-oriented and has set his eyes on Phantom House Books to produce more challenging screenplays to challenge his audience. In consequence, we also are equally challenged to work with him in a bid to show Nigeria the proper way to do things: Writerà ScreenplayàMovie. Or isn’t that how it’s done?

So all we say to our Nigerian authors and writers out there is keep writing. Let Nigeria get the chance to witness your work for a writer is nobody’s writer if you work dusts up a cupboard.

By the way, welcome to the new Nollywood.