How to edit and review an author’s work: A D.A.R.E REVIEW| A simple guide to a professional review| By Literary Agent, Tn Odu | Phantom House Books LLC

Posted: May 26, 2011 in Uncategorized


 

a D.A.R.E review is a primal form of a book review and simply means you Delete After Reading and Evaluating the manuscript (finished/unfinished).

The Review is done in three simple sweeps.

 

First SWEEP. The first sweep is the first read. During this sweep, it is paramount you get the general feel of the book.

DO NOT read for errors. DO NOT attempt to make any corrections during this sweep. Reading is all that is required.

Several Reviews have questionnaires attached to the review script to make it easier to sweep paragraphs, whole sections, and pages. If they are attached, answer them.

 

The basic questions that should be cruising through your mind during this sweep are:

Why you think this book/chapter/page/section will work/why it won’t work?

What makes it difficult to read/easy to read?

Is the story plausible/commendable/a sham?

 

IT IS IMPORTANT HERE TO NOTE: the fewer your words at this stage the more critical/direct/and unbiased your review will sound, which is constructive for the writer whose work is been reviewed, good or bad.

 

 

Second SWEEP. The second sweep is the second read. During this sweep, you are allowed to make changes following what software/editing tool you decide to use. You can also inculcate your own reading/editing strategy. You’re free to do as you wish. Read for syntax errors, spelling errors, and construction error; that is errors that you think rob a phrase or sentence of the intended or implied meaning.

 

The basic questions that should be cruising through your mind during this sweep are:

No one is that perfect, where are the bloody errors?!

Why can’t I understand a line? When and how did I get to this page?

What did he do wrong, why am I confused right about here?

 

IT IS IMPORTANT HERE TO NOTE: the more verbose/grandiose/explicit the words you use in this stage, the more constructive and easier it will be for the writer whose work is being reviewed to connect to your suggestions and the intended meaning of your review.

 

 

Last SWEEP. The third sweep is the final read. During this sweep you are allowed to read the story with your corrections to edit yourself and the reviewed writer. It is easier of the reviews and much simpler now. You are also allowed to check for disproportionate facts and figures, and changes in story content.

 

The basic questions that should be cruising through your mind during this sweep are:

Is he kidding? Did the writer just lie to me? But, the writer said a totally different name/number/subject/object/thing at the start of this episode?

I sound right/logical/funny/witty/smart/straight to the point/unbiased. What is making my review work?

On a scale of one to ten, do you think the featured author deserves to be a writer?

 

IT IS IMPORTANT HERE TO: SEND the Reviewed copy to its respectively Literary Agency and DELETE the document on your computer and in the recycle bin and the email through which it was sent immediately!!!

it is a standard practice, and the most valuable task you can do for the author.

 

 

THESE ARE THE BASIC RULES FOR A GOOD/GREAT REVIEW. THE ACT OF REVIEWING IS FUN, HILARIOUS, EXCITING AND A CHANCE TO REWRITE A MANUSCRIPT YOUR OWN WAY AND USUALLY ISN’T TEDIOUS. BOREDOM/TIREDNESS IN A REVIEW INDICATES ONLY ONE THING: THE WRITER DOESN’T DESERVE TO WRITE HENCE ISN’T WORTHY OF YOUR REVIEW. SAVE YOURSELF THE TROUBLE. THE WORK IS FAR FROM PERFECT/COMPLETE.

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Comments
  1. This is very enlightening. Being an editor myself, it makes editing a whole lot easier for me. Thank you very much.

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